left-caret
Insights

practice area articles

International Employment Law Map

January 16, 2021

By Paul Hastings Professional

employment-map-banner

MAPPING THE TRENDS: THE GLOBAL EMPLOYER UPDATE 2020

Stay-ahead of the curve with the must-know list of regional key employment law developments

 

Executive Summary

Successfully navigating the complex and dynamic international employment landscape is more challenging than ever in today’s global marketplace. The latest edition of our guide, “Mapping the Trends: The Global Employer Update 2020,” provides succinct updates on major employment law developments across 74 jurisdictions to help guide our clients manage their global workforces. After all, local realities impact global strategies.

Top Three Trends to Follow 

We encourage you to explore our guide to learn more about how these trends are playing out across the 74 jurisdictions covered in this edition. To discuss any of these updates and how they may impact your company, please contact me or another member of our International Employment practice.

Suzanne Horne, Partner
Editor

Kirsty Devine, Associate
Assistant Editor

Aashna Parekh, Associate
Assistant Editor

With special thanks to the many local counsel for their invaluable contributions to this survey.

  1. Measures to address the impact of COVID-19

    The outbreak of the COVID-19 virus has had a significant impact on the global labor market and transformed the world of work. Many countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Kyrgyz Republic, Panama, Slovakia, Spain and Ukraine have reevaluated existing working practices and have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, laws to regulate remote working. Other countries, such as Austria, South Korea, Turkey, Malaysia and Pakistan have introduced regulations supporting retention of employees (e.g., short-time working and laws to prevent employers from making reductions in force or economic dismissals) and/or Government grants, loans and subsidies in order to mitigate the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. There will inevitably be new challenges and practical issues associated with these changes that will continue to impact global employers in the year ahead and beyond.

  2. #MeToo  Movement

    The #MeToo movement continues to have a global impact and has achieved widespread progress on an international scale in 2020. It has shone a light on sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace, most recently bringing changes in laws and approach in South Korea, Malaysia, Peru, Philippines, Romania, Vietnam, the United Kingdom and the United States. As a result of these changes, many employers are required take active steps to implement clear policies, conduct investigations, provide training, improve procedures for the handling of complaints and carefully consider the use of confidentiality clauses and non-disclosure agreements. The fact that the #MeToo movement is still relevant several years after it first erupted shows that the movement is resilient and that its impact will likely still be felt for years to come.

  3. Health and Safety in the workplace

    The COVID-19 pandemic has forced employers and employees to adopt a new way of working and has highlighted the need for employers to help support employees to maintain their physical and mental wellbeing. There is undeniably now a much stronger focus on health and safety in the workplace and several countries, including Ghana, Indonesia, South Korea, Laos, Myanmar, Peru, Russia and South Africa have implemented new laws, regulations and/or measures to help prevent and control hazards in the workplace and curb the spread of the virus. We anticipate that these broader health and safety considerations together with existing wellbeing initiatives will continue to be at the forefront of employers’ minds for the remainder of 2020 and beyond. 

THE AMERICAS

ARGENTINA

BRAZIL

CANADA

CHILE

COLOMBIA

COSTA RICA

MEXICO

PANAMA

mini_Peru_

PERU

mini_Peru_

PUERTO RICO

mini_Peru_

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

USA

mini_Venezuela_032719 

VENEZUELA

EUROPE

AUSTRIA

BELGIUM

BULGARIA

mini_Czech_Republic_032719

CROATIA

mini_Czech_Republic_032719

CZECH REPUBLIC

DENMARK

FINLAND

FRANCE

GERMANY

GREECE

HUNGARY

IRELAND

ITALY

KAZAKHSTAN

LUXEMBOURG

NETHERLANDS

NORWAY

POLAND

PORTUGAL

mini_Romania_032719

ROMANIA

RUSSIA

SLOVAKIA

SLOVENIA

SWEDEN

SPAIN

SWITZERLAND

UK

UKRAINE

MIDDLE EAST

BAHRAIN

mini_Egypt_

EGYPT

ISRAEL

KUWAIT

OMAN

mini_Pakistan

PAKISTAN

SAUDI ARABIA

QATAR

UAE

ASIA PACIFIC

AUSTRALIA

CAMBODIA

CHINA

HONG KONG

INDIA

INDONESIA

JAPAN

KYRGYZ REPUBLIC

LAOS

MALAYSIA

MYANMAR

NEW ZEALAND

PHILIPPINES

SINGAPORE

mini_South_Korea

SOUTH KOREA

mini_Mozambique_032719

SRI LANKA

TAIWAN

THAILAND

mini_Turkey_

TURKEY

VIETNAM

AFRICA

Mini_Angola_

ANGOLA

mini_Cameroon_032719

CAMEROON

Mini_Ghana_

GHANA

Mini_Kenya_

KENYA

mini_Mozambique_032719

MOZAMBIQUE

mini_Nigeria

NIGERIA

SOUTH AFRICA

mini_Zambia_032719

ZAMBIA

Contributors

Image: Suzanne Horne
Suzanne Horne
Partner, Employment Law Department
Image: Kirsty Devine
Kirsty Devine
Associate, Employment Law Department
Image: Aashna Parekh
Aashna Parekh
Associate, Employment Law Department